Posts tagged History
3 Ways for Teachers to Refuel During Summer Break

For most of us who teach, summertime means we have a rich opportunity to refuel our teaching engines so that, when school begins again in a couple of months, our minds and hearts will be in great shape for building the best learning culture for our students. Here are the three best ways to accomplish this.

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On History & Education: An Interview with Victor Davis Hanson, Part 3

I think it's really important that we have a generation that are starting to read. We look at the English language and it's really becoming something that's almost Neanderthal. It's just that we're training a young generation that has a vocabulary of about 800 words. Can't we expand that to 4,000? A thesaurus could expand that vocabulary, and it would help you enrich your argument. So I think that's very important. The other thing is that we're really starving for people that have reference. We suffer from the arrogance of the present.

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Science, Resurrection & History: Reflections on Classical Education

Father James V. Schall, S.J., taught political philosophy at Georgetown University for more than five decades. He continues to be one of our nation’s most prolific writers on life’s most important questions. In 2012 he retired from university life and now lives in the Jesuit community in Los Gatos, California. This year he turned ninety. Cana Academy is grateful and honored that Father Schall agreed to an interview with our president, Andrew Zwerneman.  

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Great Teachers Open Up the World

Great teachers open up the world for their students. They lovingly point the way to newfound horizons and give their students the intellectual equipment they need to go as far as they can go. As this is the start of a new school year, I want to honor three teachers in my life. Each of them was different in age, appearance, and personality, but all three were impressive human beings who extended great gifts to me.

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Bach at the Wall

Occasionally, a man devoted to beauty and truth is given the opportunity in a moment of triumph to confront ugliness and lies. Such a moment occurred in November, 1989, when Russian cellist Mstislav Rostropovich, seeing reports of the end of the Berlin Wall, grabbed his instrument and flew from Paris to Berlin to celebrate by performing for a small, lucky crowd at the Wall.

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Lessons from Westminster

The juxtaposition of events—the visit to the war rooms and the subsequent terrorist attack at Westminster—made for a poignant history lesson. It was not lost on me that the terrorism we are experiencing today is rooted in something disturbingly similar to the movement that gave rise to the second World War: at the foundation of each are common core elements of ideology. It is worth taking a moment to examine the Nazi case for the contours of those elements and the kinds of events they fueled.

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